HE Access Network rebrands to Causeway Education

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“We believe it’s important that our work is free for end-users. This is true both for the young people who are expertly mentored through our programmes and for the state schools we support to provide the best possible outcomes for their students. As a charity we will develop partnerships with a broader range of individuals and organisations to enable us to do this.”

 

“Our name change reflects this broader ambition. We want to make sure that every young person gets the best support they can through the key transitions in their education – whether that’s choosing A-levels, apprenticeships, or graduate employment.”- Julie Randles, Causeway Education’s CEO.

 

 

Last Monday, the 8th of January, Edspace Member HE Access Network rebranded to ‘Causeway Education’.

 

Having been a part of Edspace for over a year, we were delighted to see this change and be a part of their journey. But this is more than just a name change. After a focus on universities, subject choices and personal statements, the rebrand reflects Causeway’s wider mission to guide university graduates and state-educated school leavers as they transition to professions and apprenticeships.

 

While its services have always been free for users, a broader access to funding through the new charity status, will enable it to reach out to a larger audience of disadvantaged students.

 

To optimise how its new services will fare in the real world, Causeway Education is currently piloting the program ‘Access Champions’, with 100 participating schools. If this proves successful, Causeway will look to secure funding to roll the programme out in other regions in the UK. By mentoring teachers of state schools, the team aspires to make systemic, permanent change in school structures that will have a more sustainable impact on students.

 

Research by the Sutton Trust indicates that only 23% of teachers and academics agree on the contents of a good personal statement. It also suggested that teachers were often overruling the advice provided by Causeway to students. The gap in knowledge between what is expected in personal statements and what is provided may perhaps be part of the explanation as to why state-educated students with the same grades as their privately educated peers are a third less likely to receive an offer from a leading university.

 

It’s an exciting time for the team but underpinning all these changes, Causeway Education’s core objectives stay solid; their mission and the people behind them remain the same.

 

We wish them every success as they continue to service students of the state sector.

 

Edspace team